13 [In Homily VIII. 12-16 there is inserted a curious account of the fall of man and angels, and of a race of giants.-R.]

14 [Chap. 12 has no exact parallel in the Homilies, but Homily VIII. 17 resembles it.-R.]

15 The writer means, that insult is offered to that name which belongs to God alone by giving it to others, and thus placing it in a position which is unjust to it.

16 Gen. vi. 9.

17 [There is a similar chapter in Homily IX. 7, but in a discourse: on the following day.-R.]

18 [With chaps. 14-22 compare Homily IX. 8-18. The general outline is the same, and the resemblances quite close in the larger part of both passages.-R.]

19 Matt. xxi. 22.

20 [Chaps. 23-26 have no exact parallel in the Homilies; comp. book in 16-26 The questions of the origin of evil and of free-will are more fully treated in the Recognitions.-R.]

21 There is considerable variety of reading in this sentence, and the precise meaning is somewhat obscure. The general sense, however, is sufficiently evident, that if God had refrained from creating those who He foresaw, would fall into evil, this would have been to subject His goodness co their evil.

22 [Comp. Homily VIII. 13.-R.]

23 [With chaps. 27-31 compare Homily IX. 3-7. The resemblances are quite close. See also book i. 30, 31.-R.]

24 [With chaps. 27-31 compare Homily IX. 3-7. The resemblances are quite close. See also book i. 30, 31.-R.]

25 [To chaps. 32, 33, a close parallel is found in Homily IX. 19-21.-R]

26 Matt. viii. 9. [Luke vii. 8.-R.]

27 [The close of this discourse chaps. 34-37, resembles that of the first at Tripolis, in Homily VIII. 21, 24. As already indicated much of Homily IX. finds a parallel in this book.-R.]

28 Matt. iv. 10. [Luke iv. 8.-R.]

29 [This is peculiar in this connection. There is, at least, a suggestion of anti-Pauline spirit in its teaching.-R.]

30 [Matt. xxii. 2-14.]


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