How can we ask them not to eat meat?

In a recent Go Vegan radio interview, Leslie Goldberg (author of the Vicious Vegan blog) gave an account of a conversation she had with Bill McKibben. (McKibben is a noted environmentalist and a co-founder of 350.org.) Leslie asked McKibben why he didn’t talk about meat consumption as a cause of climate change. McKibben first pointed out that most of the growth in meat consumption comes from the developing countries. Somewhat irritated, he then asked (in effect) “how can you ask people who are just starting to be able to afford and enjoy meat, not to eat meat?”

This is an intelligent question, so I thought I’d attempt to answer it. Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Ecological Economics, Politics, or the lack thereof, Vegetarianism / Veganism | 5 Comments

Norm Phelps (1939–2014)

Norm Phelps died on December 31, 2014. An activist in the promotion of vegetarianism, veganism, and compassion for animals in spiritual traditions, he authored numerous books and articles.

He followed both the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and the Unitarian Universalist tradition — neither of which, he noted, is exclusive. But he was raised as a Baptist and a Methodist and wrote about Christianity and animals as well. Continue reading

Posted in Animals and ethics, Literature / Publishing, Religion and spirituality, Vegetarianism / Veganism | 1 Comment

5280 Magazine Misses the Meat of the Matter

By Kate Lawrence

5280 The Denver Magazine recently featured an article on “Everyday Environmentalists,” presenting over 40 ways to live greener.  Pointing out that Coloradans are not as environmentally virtuous as we may think we are, the article featured excellent advice on such topics as home insulation, composting, gardening, biking–the usual and more.  Some items were very detailed, such as the advice to buy a live Christmas tree instead of an artificial one, and then plant it outside.  Readers who hike popular mountain trails were encouraged to go during the week so as to increase the likelihood that they will stay on the trail and minimize trail deterioration.  Yes, yes, yes, I’m saying to myself as I read, but when do we get to the huge environmental impact of meat consumption? Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Ecological Economics, Vegetarianism / Veganism | Leave a comment

Most Popular Blog Posts in 2014

lauren Ornelas with Nicholas at Animal Place

What makes a popular blog post — one that gets a lot of hits? Sometimes I work carefully on a post that seems timely and relevant, and it goes over like a lead balloon. At other times, I just summarize things that I think everyone knows already, and bang, it’s a hit. Thank you, Google, and thank you, Facebook. But for what it’s worth, here are Compassionate Spirit’s top 10 popular blog posts in 2014. Continue reading

Posted in Literature / Publishing | 1 Comment

Peak oil may be almost here

“Predictions are difficult, especially about the future.” This aphorism is nowhere more applicable than when predicting the date of “peak oil” — the maximum point of world oil production. In case you hadn’t noticed, oil prices are falling dramatically. Until about six months ago, oil (“West Texas Intermediate”) had hovered for several years in the region of $100 a barrel, reaching $107 on July 23. But by last Friday (December 12), it was below $60. If we’re close to peak oil, and oil is getting scarce, shouldn’t the price be going up? What happened, and why?

Continue reading

Posted in Ecological Economics, Limits to Growth, Peak oil, Politics, or the lack thereof | Leave a comment

Are the Economists Hopeless on Environmental Issues?

The world has serious problems, such as climate change, peak oil, and resource depletion generally. Economists should be leading the charge on these types of issues, but except for the very few “ecological economists,” like Herman Daly, they say increasingly strange things about a parallel world which seems to have only a tangential relationship to the one in which we actually live.

A case in point is the recent book The Climate Casino (2013) by William Nordhaus. His book is quite insightful on several levels. The Climate Casino is a disturbing book, but unfortunately some of what makes it disturbing is not intentional on the part of the author.

Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Ecological Economics, Limits to Growth, Peak oil | 2 Comments

Whole Foods Escalates Attacks on Rabbit Advocates

lauren Ornelas with Nicholas at Animal Place (the lower-case “l” in lauren’s first name is the way she spells her name)

Well-known vegan and social justice activist lauren Ornelas was arrested for leafleting during a peaceful protest against the sale of rabbit meat on Sunday, November 16, in Sebastopol, California. Then, a week later (i. e. yesterday), there was another protest, with three protesters briefly entering Whole Foods, but this time no arrests were made.

That’s right: Ornelas was arrested for leafleting. Continue reading

Posted in Animals and ethics, Vegetarianism / Veganism | 19 Comments

Chris Hedges: Go Vegan for the Planet

Chris Hedges has seen "Cowspiracy"

Chris Hedges was a war correspondent, worked for the Greens in 2008 and 2012, and was part of the “Occupy Wall Street” movement. He’s also, interestingly enough, a Presbyterian minister. He is known to me personally mostly as the author of War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning, a book which is at once interesting, powerfully written, and quite disturbing. It was so powerful, in fact, that I couldn’t finish it. Forcing myself to finish it would be like forcing a vegan to watch slaughterhouse footage. I get it already; I don’t want to watch it.

Chris Hedges is also now a vegan, citing serious environmental concerns. He describes this in his recent article, “Saving the Planet, One Meal at a Time.” Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Ecological Economics, Nonviolence, Politics, or the lack thereof, Vegetarianism / Veganism | 6 Comments

Ignoring Food Choices — Once Again

Richard Heinberg, a prominent member of the Post-Carbon Institute, has issued a 10-point plan on “How to Shrink the Economy Without Crashing It.” He makes plenty of excellent points, but it contains a glaring omission: it (once again!) leaves out any discussion of food choices.

It’s distressing to see that advocates of reducing the human impact on the planet ignore the significance of our food choices. This was exactly the theme pursued by the recent documentary “Cowspiracy,” with which the Post-Carbon Institute (PCI) is perhaps unfamiliar. Without a change in food choices, how much shrinkage in the economy’s effects on the planet will we actually see? Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Ecological Economics, Limits to Growth, Simple living, Vegetarianism / Veganism | 7 Comments

Extracted (review)

Extracted. How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet.
Ugo Bardi. Chelsea Green Publishing, 2014.

Many people have heard of “peak oil,” and are concerned that finite fossil fuels such as oil, coal, and natural gas cannot support our economy indefinitely. But what about metals, like copper, gold, platinum, aluminum, and others? Isn’t there a finite supply of those in the earth’s crust as well? Do we have to worry about “running out” of metals?

Well, actually we do, although it’s more complicated than the phrase “running out” implies. This is the topic of Ugo Bardi’s clearly written and quite interesting book on minerals and how humans extract them. Continue reading

Posted in Ecological Economics, Limits to Growth | 2 Comments